Hydro Review

Hydro Construction in Canada: A Snapshot of Activity

Construction of hydroelectric projects in Canada is proceeding at a strong pace. To illustrate the types of development activities occurring, Hydro Review presents information about construction under way at 15 facilities in four Canadian provinces.

Hydroelectricity is an important generation resource for Canada. Overall, 60 percent of the electricity used in the country is generated at hydropower facilities. Hydropower is economical in comparison to other large-scale generating options because it has a very long service life and is not subject to high cost volatility. Consequently, many Canadian businesses and residents – especially those in hydro-rich provinces like Québec and Manitoba – enjoy some of the lowest electricity rates in North America.

Opportunities to develop even more hydropower in Canada are abundant. A recent study commissioned by the Canadian Hydropower Association reveals an untapped potential of 163,000 MW of hydropower – more than twice the amount in operation. While Québec, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Newfoundland and Labrador hold significant potential for development, there is potential available in all provinces and territories.

Provincially owned utilities, private companies, and First Nations are working to develop this potential. More than 25 new hydro projects totaling more than 2,500 MW are being constructed. These projects range in size from less than 1 MW to more than 750 MW. They represent an investment of more than C$16.6 billion (US$15.6 billion). When complete, these projects will contribute toward meeting growing demand for electricity and reducing reliable on imported electricity.

Another 250 projects representing another 23,000 MW are being studied for possible development in the future. These projects range in size from 200 kW to 4,500 MW.

Featured construction activity

To illustrate the kind of hydro construction activity occurring in Canada, Hydro Review selected 15 projects in the provinces of British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Québec. Construction work at these projects, detailed on pages 12-18, is in various stages. A few of the projects are substantially complete; some are just beginning, with on-line dates extending to the end of 2012.

As shown in Table 1, these projects, in total, provide nearly 2,100 MW of clean, renewable, reliable generating capacity in Canada, and are expected to produce more than 16,700 gigawatt-hours of electricity each year. They represent an investment of about C$11.8 billion (US$12.1 billion).

Most of the projects featured on the following pages are conventional hydro facilities. Seven of the 15 are run-of-river arrangements, with little impoundment.

Many of the projects – including the 120-MW Brilliant Expansion, the 768-MW Eastmain-1-A project and the Rupert River Diversion, the 125-MW La Sarcelle project, and the Niagara Tunnel Project – will maximize the use of available water and/or existing infrastructure.

One project, the new 40.6-MW Magpie generating station, is being constructed at the site of an existing powerhouse that has sat idle for nearly 20 years.

While construction activity at these 15 projects is varied in scope and size, trends worth noting include:

– Extensive amount of tunnel excavation work;

– Minimizing effects on the environment; and

– Involvement by First Nations.

Tunnel excavation work

Tunnel excavation is being performed at many of the hydro projects profiled in this article. For example, at the 49-MW Ashlu Creek project in British Columbia, contractors are using a tunnel boring machine to excavate a 4.4-kilometer-long tunnel.

For the Niagara Tunnel Project in Ontario, designed to provide water to generate additional electricity at three existing hydro stations, contractors are digging a tunnel that will be 10.4 kilometers long and 12.7 meters in internal diameter. The finished tunnel will be capable of delivering 500 cubic meters per second of water.

At the 768-MW Eastmain-1-A and Rupert Diversion project in Québec, a 2.9-kilometer-long transfer tunnel is being built to divert flow from the Rupert River into the reservoir for the 480-MW Eastmain 1 project (already in operation). From there, the water will flow through the Eastmain 1 and Eastmain-1-A powerhouses and then through three more existing generating stations.

Minimizing environmental effects

Environmental challenges abound in the development of hydro projects; these challenges are often related to fish protection.

An example is the Brilliant Expansion project, constructed on the Kootenay River – home to a population of white sturgeon listed as endangered by the Canadian government. To protect these endangered fish during the tailrace excavation, contractors used innovative rock pads to minimize shock waves during drilling and blasting. During excavation work in the intake area rock plug, the contractor used a “bubble curtain” – compressed air pumped through perforated pipes – to prevent the blast shockwaves from traveling through the bubbles, thus protecting the fish.

Suspended solids are another concern during construction work. At the 200-MW Wuskwatim project in Manitoba, a real-time total suspended solids monitoring system is being used during all in-stream construction activities. This monitoring system will measure total suspended solids at strategic locations so that the contractor can adjust construction methods as necessary.

Involvement by First Nations

Many hydro project developers in Canada are gaining the support and cooperation of First Nations. For example, development of the 123-MW East Toba River and 73-MW Montrose Creek projects in the province of British Columbia is supported by the Klahoose First Nations and Sliammon First Nations. Both First Nations are participants in the construction program for these projects.


Table 1: Snapshot of Hydro Projects Under Construction in Canada
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In other hydro projects – such as the 23-MW Umbata Falls project in Ontario and the 200-MW Wuskwatim generating station in Manitoba – First Nations are development partners.

“Claims to fame”

The projects listed on the following pages have many “claims to fame.” Among them are:

– Installation of the largest Kaplan-Saxo turbines in Canada (at the Magpie station);

– Use of the world’s largest hard rock tunnel boring machine (at the Niagara Tunnel Project); and

– Use of the deepest plastic concrete cutoff walls ever installed (at the 385-MW Peribonka project).

Hydro Review congratulates the owners of the 15 featured projects and acknowledges their efforts to provide the information on the following pages.

Ashlu Creek Hydroelectric Project

Owner: Ashlu Creek Investments Limited Partnership, owned by Innergex II Inc

Province: British Columbia

River: Ashlu Creek

Capacity: 49 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 265 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: March 2009

Estimated Development Cost: C$125 million

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

Ashlu Creek is a run-of-river project on Ashlu Creek, a tributary to the Squamish River. The project is about 30 kilometers northwest of Squamish in southwestern British Columbia. The project will divert flows from behind a weir into a vertical drop shaft, sub-horizontal tunnel, and short section of buried high-pressure penstock to a surface powerhouse in the lower reach of Ashlu Creek. The powerhouse will contain three horizontal Francis turbines. Construction work began in August 2006, and the project is scheduled to begin commercial operations in March 2009. The transmission line and substation were completed in April 2007 to provide power to the tunnel boring machine for tunnel excavation.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

BKL Engineering, Elite Engineering, Frontier Kemper Constructors ULC, Golder Associates Ltds, Groupe RSW inc., Hatch Mott MacDonald, Ledcor CMI Ltd., VA Tech Hydro Canada Inc., Westpark Electric Ltd.

For Further Details:

www.ashlucreek.com/project-information

Brilliant Expansion

Owner: Columbia Power Corporation

Province: British Columbia

River: Kootenay

Capacity: 120 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 500 gigawatt-hours

On-Line Date: September 2007

Estimated Development Cost: C$205 million

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

The Brilliant Expansion project is on the Kootenay River, just outside Castlegar, in the southeast corner of British Columbia. Situated immediately downstream of the existing Brilliant Dam and 145-MW Generating Station, Brilliant Expansion will use water that is normally spilled over the dam, generating 120 MW of power. Commercial operations began in the summer of 2007. Before construction of the expansion began, Columbia Power Corporation (CPC) and its joint venture partner, Columbia Basin Trust (CBT), carried out significant upgrades to Brilliant Dam. The partners invested $100 million in upgrades, which increased capacity at the project to 145 MW from an original 120 MW. The Brilliant Expansion project, which began in spring 2003, consists of a powerhouse structure, an intake channel, a power tunnel connecting the intake to the powerhouse, and an access tunnel. Water enters the power tunnel through the intake area, which is 30 meters high with a capacity of 560 cubic meters per second, and controlled by one slide gate. The power tunnel is 12.5 meters in diameter and 170 meters long. The powerhouse is 62 meters in height and features a 120-MW, five-blade, variable pitch Kaplan turbine and a generator with a 142-MVa capacity. The expansion project increases total capacity of the Brilliant Complex to 265 MW.

Construction Innovations Applied:

This project presented environmental challenges because the Kootenay and upper Columbia rivers are home to a population of white sturgeon. In 2006, this species was listed as endangered by the Canadian government under the Species At Risk Act. Extra care had to be taken during the in-river work. During the tailrace excavation, clean, excavated rock was placed in the tailrace area to provide innovative rock pads. Drilling and blasting of the bedrock below the river bottom was done through these rock pads to minimize shock waves and the risk to the sturgeon. Throughout drilling and blasting of the intake area rock plug, a “bubble curtain” was used to help prevent damage to the existing dam structure, as well as to protect any fish in the vicinity. Holes were drilled in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe, which were placed underwater around the rock plug area. Compressed air was pumped through the pipes, creating the bubble curtain, which works by preventing the blast shockwaves from traveling through the bubbles.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Alstom Power, The Brilliant Expansion Consortium (a joint venture of Skanska-Chant JV, SNC-Lavalin Inc. and Skanska International Civil Engineering, AB), Kone

For Further Details:

www.columbiapower.org

Chute-Allard

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Saint-Maurice

Capacity: 62 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 900 gigawatt-hours (including Rapides-des-Couers)

Expected On-Line Date: End of 2008

Estimated Development Cost: C$680 million (including Rapides-des-Couers)

Description of Project:

Chute-Allard is part of a two-powerhouse project on the Saint-Maurice River (the other powerhouse is 76-MW Rapides- des-Couers – see page 18). The dam will be 17.5 meters tall. The powerhouse will contain six Saxo turbine-generators. Work on the project began in fall 2005.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Click here to enlarge image

Arno, CLS Enterprise, Demathieu and Hand-barrow-Cegerco S.E.N.C., Fernand Gilbert Ltee, Litostroj

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/cardc/projet/index.html

Eastmain-1-A and Rupert Diversion

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Rupert

Capacity: 768 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 8,500 gigawatt-hours (including La Sarcelle)

Expected On-Line Date: 2012

Estimated Development Cost: C$5 billion (including La Sarcelle)

Description of Project:

Eastmain-1-A is part of a two-powerhouse project (the other powerhouse is 125-MW La Sarcelle – see page 15). This portion of the project consists of building the 768-MW, three-unit Eastmain-1-A powerhouse and diverting 71 percent of the flow in the Rupert River to the Eastmain 1 Reservoir. The diverted flow will be used to generate electricity at 480-MW Eastmain 1 (already in operation) and the Eastmain-1-A powerhouse, and then at three more existing generating stations in the La Grande Complex (5,616-MW Robert Bourassa, 1,998-MW La Grande 2A, and 1,368-MW La Grande 1). The entire project will feature four dams, a spillway on the Rupert River, 75 dikes, a 2.9-kilometer-long transfer tunnel between the Rupert forebay and tailbay, and a network of canals with a total length of about 12 kilometers. Construction of the project began in January 2007. The first of the three Francis turbine-generating units in the Eastmain-1-A powerhouse is scheduled to go on line in 2012.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Alstom, CRT-Hamel, EBC-Neilson s.e.n.c., SBC-EMF, Simard-Beaudry Construction Inc.

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/eastmain1a/fr/index.html

East Toba River

Owner: Toba Montrose General Partnership

Province: British Columbia

River: East Toba River near the Toba Inlet

Capacity: 123 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 725 gigawatt-hours (including Montrose Creek)

Expected On-Line Date: 2010

Estimated Development Cost: C$650 million (including Montrose Creek)

Description of Project:

The East Toba River plant is part of a two-powerhouse project (the other powerhouse is 73-MW Montrose Creek – see page 17). The project involves constructing two run-of-river facilities, a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the powerhouse sites to Saltery Bay, connection to the British Columbia Trans- mission Corporation grid, and associated access roads. The project is intended to help British Columbia meet its growing electricity demand and also to help reduce the province’s reliance on imported electricity. The project development is supported by the Klahoose First Nations and Sliammon First Nations. Both First Nations are participants in the construction program. Challenges faced in developing this project include the logistics of performing construction in a remote location, working in sensitive environmental conditions, working within difficult weather windows, and transportation of heavy pre-assembled machinery.

Click here to enlarge image

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Andritz VA Tech Hydro, Knight Piésold Ltd., Peter Kiewit Sons Co.

For Further Details:

www.plutonic.ca

La Sarcelle

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Rupert

Capacity: 125 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 8,500 gigawatt-hours (including Eastmain-1-A)

Expected On-Line Date: 2012

Estimated Development Cost: C$5 billion (including Eastmain-1-A)

Description of Project:

La Sarcelle is part of a two-powerhouse project (the other powerhouse is 768-MW Eastmain-1-A – see page 14). This portion of the project consists of building the 125-MW, three-unit La Sarcelle powerhouse. The entire project will feature four dams, a spillway on the Rupert River, 75 dikes, a 2.9-kilometer-long transfer tunnel between the Rupert forebay and tailbay, and a network of canals with a total length of about 12 kilometers. Construction began in January 2007, and the first of the three bulb turbine-generating unit in the La Sarcelle powerhouse is scheduled to go on line in 2012.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Alstom, CRT-Hamel, EBC-Neilson s.e.n.c., SBC-EMF, Simard-Beaudry Construction Inc.

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/eastmain1a/fr/index.html

Magpie

Owner: Société en commandite Magpie (Limited Partnership Magpie)

Province: Québec

River: Magpie

Capacity: 40.6 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 180 gigawatt-hours

On-Line Date: October 2007

Estimated Development Cost: C$75 million

Description of Project:

The project is at the site of an existing 2-MW generating station that was closed in 1989. This run-of-river site with an upgraded gross head of 22 meters is comprised of a 7-meter natural fall, a variable-height concrete weir, and topped by a 3.29-meter-diameter inflatable rubber dam. This project consists of a combined intake and powerhouse structure housing three Kaplan-Saxo type turbines and generators. These three turbines are the largest of their type in Canada. A flow of 210 cubic meters per second is channeled to the intake by a 50-meter-long intake canal and discharged into a 150-meter-long tailrace canal. Abutment structures on both banks of the river complete the closure on the upstream face, while power generated is delivered to the Hydro-Québec grid via a 161-kilovolt substation. Work on the project began in September 2005.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Click here to enlarge image

Arno, Bridgestone, Cribtec, Genivar, Lajoie-Somec, Litostroj, Mecan-Hydro, Siemens

For Further Details:

www.rivieremagpie.ca

McLeod Dam Green Energy Project

Owner: Quinte Conservation

Province: Ontario

River: Moira

Capacity: 0.95 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 5 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: January 2008

Estimated Development

Cost: C$4 million

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

The McLeod Ice and Flood Control Dam in the city of Belleville, Ontario, is one of 39 water control structures owned by Quinte Conservation. Quinte Conservation, one of Ontario’s 36 conservation authorities, is a community-based environmental protection agency. As part of its “Go Green” initiative, Quinte Conservation evaluated the potential for adding a hydroelectric component to its water control structures (i.e., using the impounded water for the generation of electricity). McLeod Dam was identified as the best site at which to add hydropower. The dam will continue to operate primarily for its flood and ice control capacity, with the hydro project being strictly run of river. Two 3-meter-wide by 3-meter-high concrete culverts pass through the dam and house control gates. One double-regulated Kaplan turbine will be placed in each culvert. To create enough head to operate the turbines, an inflatable rubber dam will be placed on top of the existing weir in the spillway. Construction began in July 2007. The plant is scheduled to be operational in July 2008.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Hatch Energy, H.R. Doornekamp Construction Ltd., Obermeyer

For Further Details:

www.quinteconservation.ca

Mercier

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Gatineau

Capacity: 50.5 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 282 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: Fall 2008

Estimated Development Cost

(in Canadian dollars): C$140 million

Description of Project:

The project will feature a new 50.5-MW powerhouse near Mercier Dam on the Gatineau River. The powerhouse will contain five turbine-generating units. Work began in 2004.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Construction Garnier, Groupe CRT, SCOH, Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/projets/index.html

Montrose Creek

Owner: Toba Montrose General Partnership

Province: British Columbia

River: Montrose Creek near the Toba Inlet

Capacity: 73 MW

Click here to enlarge image

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 725 gigawatt-hours (including East Toba River)

Expected On-Line Date: 2010

Estimated Development Cost: C$650 million (including East Toba River)

Description of Project:

The Montrose Creek plant is part of a two-powerhouse project (the other powerhouse is 123-MW with East Toba River – see page 14). The project involves constructing two run-of-river facilities, a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the powerhouse sites to Saltery Bay, connection to the British Columbia Transmission Corporation grid, and associ- ated access roads. The project is intended to help British Columbia meet its growing electricity demand and also to help reduce the province’s reliance on imported electricity. The project development is supported by the Klahoose First Nations and Sliammon First Nations. Both First Nations are participants in the construction program. Challenges faced in developing this project include the logistics of performing construction in a remote location, working in sensitive environmental conditions, working within difficult weather windows, and transportation of heavy pre-assembled machinery.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Andritz VA Tech Hydro, Knight Piésold Ltd., Peter Kiewit Sons Co.

For Further Details:

www.plutonic.ca

Niagara Tunnel Project

Owner: Ontario Power Generation

Province: Ontario

River: Niagara

Click here to enlarge image

Expected Annual Electricity Production: Provides water to generate an additional 1,600 gigawatt-hours at three existing stations

Expected On-Line Date: 2010

Estimated Development Cost: C$985 million

Description of Project:

Ontario Power Generation’s Niagara Tunnel Project includes the planning, design, and construction of a 10.4-kilometer-long, 12.7-meter-internal-diameter tunnel and associated facilities. The tunnel will divert an additional 500 cubic meters per second of water from above Niagara Falls to the three Sir Adam Beck generating stations near Queenston: 498-MW Sir Adam Beck 1, 1,499-MW Sir Adam Beck 2, and 900-MW Sir Adam Beck 3. The design/build contractor, Strabag Inc, is using the world’s largest hard rock tunnel boring machine (14.44 meters in diameter) to excavate the tunnel. When complete in 2010, the Niagara Tunnel will deliver enough additional water to increase average annual energy output from the Sir Adam Beck stations by about 1,600 gigawatt-hours – enough electricity to meet the needs of a city twice the size of Niagara Falls.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Bermingham Construction, Dufferin Construction, GeoFoundations, Hatch Acres, Hatch Mott MacDonald, H+E Logistics, ILF Engineering Consultants, McNally Construction, Morrison Hershfield, The Robbins Company, Rowa Tunnelling Logistics, Strabag Inc.

For Further Details:

www.opg.com/power/hydro/new_projects/ntp/index.asp

Peribonka

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Peribonka

Capacity: 385 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 2,200 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: March 2008

Estimated Development Cost: C$1.2 billion

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

The project will feature an 80-meter-tall dam, spillway, and underground powerhouse. The powerhouse will contain three Francis turbine-generators. The crest gate will contain three valves, two of which will be heated. The dam will impound a reservoir 35 kilometers long, with a total surface area of 32 square kilometers. Work on the project began in April 2004. Reservoir filling is scheduled to begin in November 2007. The first turbine-generating unit is scheduled to go on line in March 2008 and the last in July 2008.

Construction Innovations Applied:

To provide an impervious barrier, the dam features plastic concrete cutoff walls under the main dam and one dike. These are the deepest plastic concrete walls ever installed (114 meters at the deepest point).

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Alstom Canada Energie, Bauer spezialtiefbau GmbH, Canmec Industrial Inc., LAR Machinerie Inc., Roctest Ltd.

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/peribonka/index.html

Rapides-des-Coeurs

Owner: Hydro-Québec

Province: Québec

River: Saint-Maurice

Capacity: 76 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 900 gigawatt-hours (including Chute-Allard)

Expected On-Line Date: End of 2008

Estimated Development Cost: C$680 million (including Chute-Allard)

Click here to enlarge image

Description of Project:

Rapides-des-Couers is part of a two-powerhouse project on the Saint-Maurice River (the other powerhouse is 62-MW Chute-Allard – see page 12). The dam will be 22.5 meters tall. The powerhouse will contain six Saxo turbine-generators. Work on the project began in fall 2005.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Arno, Constructions Bob-son Inc., Demathieu et Bard-Cegerco S.E.N.C., Litostroj

For Further Details:

www.hydroquébec.com/cardc/projet/index.html

Umbata Falls Hydroelectric Project

Owner: Umbata Falls Limited Partnership, owned by both Pic-River First Nation and Innergex II Inc

Province: Ontario

River: White

Capacity: 23 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 109 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: July 2008

Estimated Development Cost: C$60 million

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

The 23-MW Umbata Falls project features a powerhouse containing two Kaplan units under a net head of 34.5 meters and a plant flow of 37.5 cubic meters per second. Umbata Falls is a run-of-river project in the White River drainage basin, a tributary to the Lake Superior, and is located about 30 kilometers southeast of Marathon, Ontario. The project will divert flows from behind a weir about 500 meters up the White River directly into a low-grade tunnel and a short section of buried high-pressure penstock to a surface powerhouse in the lower reach of the river. Work on the project began early in 2006 with the upgrade of a 23-kilometer-long forest service road. The project is scheduled to begin commercial operations in July 2008. The transmission line was completed in October 2006 to provide power to the jumbo machines during construction of the tunnel.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

BPR Energy inc., CRT Construction inc., MGB inc., Neilson inc., Powertel inc., VA Tech Hydro Canada Inc.

Wuskwatim Generating Station

Owner: Wuskwatim Power Limited Partnership, an equity partnership involving the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation (NCN) and Manitoba Hydro

Province: Manitoba

River: Burntwood

Capacity: 200 MW

Expected Annual Electricity Production: 1,500 gigawatt-hours

Expected On-Line Date: December 2012

Estimated Development Cost: C$1.3 billion, including all transmission and generation components

Description of Project:

Click here to enlarge image

Wuskwatim represents the first time Manitoba Hydro has entered into an equity partnership with a First Nations community on a generating station project. The 200-MW, run-of-river hydroelectric station is to be located on the Burntwood River in the Nelson House Resource Management Area in northern Manitoba. The low-head design will create less than one half of a square kilometer of flooding, the least amount of flooding of any hydro project in northern Manitoba. There will be three generating units, each with a vertical-shaft, fixed-blade propeller turbine. The spillway will have three bays, each 9 meters wide by 16 meters high, and will be capable of safely passing a peak discharge of about 2,650 cubic meters per second (the probable maximum flood). Excavation for the powerhouse and spillway is scheduled to start in 2008. Construction of a 48-kilometer-long all-weather access road began in August 2006 and is scheduled for completion in 2008. Construction of the site infrastructure and camps began in early 2007 and is scheduled to be completed by March 2008. The first turbine unit is scheduled to begin operating in May 2012 and the last unit for December 2012.

Construction Innovations being Applied:

As part of the sediment management plan, a real-time total suspended solids (TSS) monitoring system will be used during all in-stream construction activities. The monitoring system will measure TSS at remote strategic locations and transmit data to the site in real time. The foremost benefit of a real-time system is that it will allow the general civil contractor to monitor effects on TSS and immediately adjust construction methods as cofferdam material is being placed in-stream.

Service and Product Suppliers Involved:

Acres Manitoba Limited, ATCO Structures Inc., Criti-Care, Derksen Mechanical Services, General Electric Hydro, NCN/Sodexho Joint Venture, NCN/Strilkiwski Joint Venture, Penn-Co Construction Canada Ltd., Stittco Energy

Click here to enlarge image

For Further Details:

www.hydro.mb.ca/projects/wuskwatim/overview.shtml

www.ncncree.com/ncn/wuskwatimproject.html

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